Looking For Lush Locks? Try One of These 5 Types of Hair Extensions

Looking For Lush Locks? Try One of These 5 Types of Hair Extensions

I don’t know about you, but my dream is to have a glorious, cascading, Pantene-commercial waterfall of thick and beautiful hair.

Unfortunately, my hair never got on board with my hopes and dreams. It’s curly and reaches just below my shoulder blades, but it is not a thick, glossy, or cascading waterfall, and I don’t think it ever will be. I was not blessed with the long, thick hair genes.

But I haven’t given up on my goal. Instead, I’ve turned to extensions to help me out.

I won’t lie. The world of hair extensions is confusing, even after I’ve spent a long time reading and researching the different kinds. My hair is fine, so I was terrified for a long time of doing anything that might damage it even further, including getting extensions.

While it’s true that extensions CAN damage your hair, the reality is that they don’t have to. As long as you partner up with a knowledgeable stylist and do your due diligence in choosing the right type of extensions, there’s very low risk of doing any long-term damage to your hair.

If you do your due diligence in choosing the right type of hair extensions, there’s very low risk of doing any long-term damage to your hair.

If you, like me, felt both curious and overwhelmed whenever the topic of extensions came up, this one’s for you. I’m going to talk about the most popular hair extension types so that you can see just how many options you have, no matter what your hair type is!

 

Clip-ins

These are a fun place for total beginners to start because they’re totally temporary. Each section of hair is attached to a sturdy clip, and you simply secure it directly onto the roots of your actual hair.

There’s a definite learning curve to getting these to stay securely and lay naturally, but there are tons of YouTube tutorials that will show you exactly how to do this by yourself at home! (And really, what else are you doing with your days anyway? What better time to experiment than quarantine!)

The only catch to these is that you have to remove them before bed. They’ll pull your roots and get horribly tangled if you try to wear them for days on end.

 

Tape-ins

Tape sounds not awesome, I know. Who wants to have sticky tape yanked off of their hair, right? Fortunately, the adhesive used in these extensions is specially formulated so that it can be dissolved by your stylist when you go in for removal or reapplication, so there shouldn’t be any pain!

Tape-ins are lightweight and pretty quick to apply, but you should go to a stylist for them because it requires skill, precision, and the ability to see your whole head at once in order to get the best results.

 

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Sew-ins

This is often referred to as a “weave,” and it works best for people with thick, textured, or very curly hair. The natural hair has to be braided into tight cornrows, and then the extensions are sewn directly into the braids.

If your hair is fine or thin, skip this type of extension. They’re heavy and can easily damage your natural hair.

 

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Fusion

This method is definitely more time-intensive than most of the others I’ve mentioned. This is because the technique involves bonding individual strands of hair to your existing hair with a special glue. The results look incredibly natural, and you’ll notice that your hair has a lot more natural movement than with other types of extensions, but it can take several hours to get the results you’re after.

If you’re prone to headaches, this might not be the right choice for you. Some people say that the beads cause uncomfortable tension headaches! I’ve never tried this before, but I can see how having dozens of tiny beads in your hair could be painful.

 

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Halo Hair

This is actually a type of extension that I only recently learned about, and it’s probably the one I’ll try next.

Unlike all of the other methods I’ve listed so far, this type of hair extension doesn’t attach to your hair at all! Instead, there’s an adjustable “halo” band that blends into the hair at the crown of your head. You secure the band underneath the top layer of your hair, blend it out with a teasing comb, and that’s it! Nothing pulling on your head or putting tension on your hair.

Like clip-ins, these halos aren’t meant to be worn 24/7. They’re an easy, temporary way to add length and volume to your natural hair.

 

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Let’s Chat!

I’m not a hair extension expert yet, but I’m getting there! If life won’t give me the flowing mane I want, you better believe I’m gonna buy one for myself.

I haven’t taken the plunge on semi-permanent extensions yet, but I’m thinking that the halo hair is going to be my next Pandemic Beauty Salon project. What do you think? Share your questions and extension knowledge with me, please! Let’s all have cascading waterfalls of hair when we reemerge post-pandemic.

 

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